U. N. General Assembly condemns Syria by by vote of 137 to 12, with 17 abstentions (text of resolution and updated vote breakdown)—Syria Update #6

Today, February 16, 2012, the United Nations General Assembly approved by an overwhelming margin (137 in favor, 12 against, with 17 abstentions) a resolution (Doc.A/66/L.36) strongly condemning “widespread and systematic human rights violations by Syrian authorities.”

A press release summarizing the resolution and the interventions by various delegations is found here.

The text of the resolution, which has been made available by the Los Angeles Times, is found here.

The Washington Post provided one of the earliest reports on the vote tally.  Colum Lynch has provided a more complete breakdownn of the vote. See Colum Lynch, “The Syria List of Shame”, Turtle Bay: Reporting from Within the United Nations (Foreign Policy blog), February 17, 2012.

For some reason, the United Nations appears to not yet have published the official vote tally. In the meantime, Lynch’s breakdown of the vote, including the “no shows” is the most authoritative the Observer has ben able to find. That breadkdown is as follows:

Voting Against

Belarus
Bolivia
Cuba
China
Ecuador
Iran
Nicaragua
North Korea
Russia
Syria
Venezuela
Zimbabwe

Abstaining

Algeria
Angola
Armenia
Cameroon
Comoros
Fiji
Lebanon
Myanmar
Namibia
Nepal
Sri Lanka
St. Vincent and Grenadines
Suriname
Tanzania
Tuvalu
Uganda
Vietnam

No Shows (Not Present)

Burundi
Cambodia
Cape Verde
Dominica
Dominican Republic
Equatorial Guinea
Eritrea
Ethiopia
Gabon
Gambia
Guinea-Bissau
Kiribati
Kyrgyzstan
Laos
Madagascar
Mali
Palau
Philippines
San Tome Principe
Sierra Leon
Swaziland
Tajikistan
Tonga
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Vanuatu
Yemen

Melissa Bell of the Washington Post observes, “It’s striking to note that aside from Syria and Iran, no other Middle East country voted no. Two, however, did abstain: Lebanon and Algeria.

Five countries from the Western Hemisphere voted against the resolution:

Bolivia
Cuba
Ecuador
Nicaragua
Venezuela

Two additional countries from the region abstained:

St. Vincent
Suriname

From Africa, one country voted against the resolution:

Zimbabwe

In addition, the following 6 African countries abstained:

Angola
Cameroon
Comoros
Namibia
Tanzania
Uganda

***

Hopefully, the official vote break-down should become available from the United Nations within a few more days.

The Trenchant Observer

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The Observer
"The Trenchant Observer" is edited and published by The Observer, an international lawyer who has taught International Law, Human Rights, and Comparative Law at major U.S. universities, including Harvard, Brandeis, the University of Pittsburgh, and the University of Kansas. He is a former staff attorney at the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights of the Organization of American States (IACHR), where he was in charge of Brazil, Haiti, Mexico and the United States, and also worked on complaints from and reports on other countries including Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, El Salvador, Nicaragua, and Guatemala. As an international development expert, he has worked on Rule of Law, Human Rights, and Judicial Reform in a number of countries in Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, and the Russian Federation. In the private sector, The Observer has worked as an international attorney for a leading national law firm and major global companies, on joint ventures and other matters in a number of countries in Europe (including Russia and the Ukraine), throughout Latin America and the Caribbean, and in Australia, Indonesia, Vietnam, China and Japan. The Trenchant Observer blog provides an unfiltered international perspective for news and opinion on current events, in their historical context, drawing on a daily review of leading German, French, Spanish and English newspapers as well as the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, and other American newspapers, and on sources in other countries relevant to issues being analyzed. The Observer speaks fluent English, French, German, Portuguese and Spanish, and also knows other languages. He holds an S.J.D. or Doctor of Juridical Science in International Law from Harvard University, and a Doctor of Law (J.D.) and a Master of the Science of Law (J.S.M.), from Stanford University. As an undergraduate, he received a Bachelor of Arts degree, also from Stanford, where he graduated “With Great Distinction” (summa cum laude) and received the James Birdsall Weter Prize for the best Senior Honors Thesis in History. In addition to having taught as a Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School, The Observer has been a Visiting Scholar at Harvard University's Center for International Affairs (CFIA). His fellowships include a Stanford Postdoctoral Fellowship in Law and Development, the Rómulo Gallegos Fellowship in International Human Rights awarded by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, and a Harvard MacArthur Fellowship in International Peace and Security. Beyond his articles in The Trenchant Observer, he is the author of two books and numerous scholarly articles on subjects of international and comparative law. Currently he is working on a manuscript drawing on the best articles that have appeared in the blog.