BREAKING NEWS — U.S. says very high likelihood Russia bombed humanitarian aid convoy in Syria

LATE BREAKING NEWS!!!

Developing

Eric Schmitt, Michael R. Gordon, and Somini Sengupta, “U.S. Officials Say Russia Probably Attacked U.N. Humanitarian Convoy,” New York Times, September 20, 2016.

Valdimir Putin may have ripped off his mask and shown the all-believing Barack Obama and John Kerry what close observers of events in Syria since 2011 and in the Crimea and the eastern Ukraine since 2014 have understood for some time:

Putin is an implacable adversary of the U.S. and NATO, and should not be trusted.

Yet the U.S. and its allies should also examine what may have appeared to be perfidy in Putin’s eyes, the bombing and killing of 62 Syrian soldiers in recent days.

How did such an “accident” happen, particularly on the eve of the next stage of joint U.S. military cooperation, under the terms the American-Russian ceasefire deal?

Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter would be well-advised to appoint a high-level commission of inquiry to find out what happend here.

The Trenchant Observer

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The Observer
"The Trenchant Observer" is edited and published by The Observer, an international lawyer who has taught International Law, Human Rights, and Comparative Law at major U.S. universities, including Harvard, Brandeis, the University of Pittsburgh, and the University of Kansas. He is a former staff attorney at the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights of the Organization of American States (IACHR), where he was in charge of Brazil, Haiti, Mexico and the United States, and also worked on complaints from and reports on other countries including Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, El Salvador, Nicaragua, and Guatemala. As an international development expert, he has worked on Rule of Law, Human Rights, and Judicial Reform in a number of countries in Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, and the Russian Federation. In the private sector, The Observer has worked as an international attorney for a leading national law firm and major global companies, on joint ventures and other matters in a number of countries in Europe (including Russia and the Ukraine), throughout Latin America and the Caribbean, and in Australia, Indonesia, Vietnam, China and Japan. The Trenchant Observer blog provides an unfiltered international perspective for news and opinion on current events, in their historical context, drawing on a daily review of leading German, French, Spanish and English newspapers as well as the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, and other American newspapers, and on sources in other countries relevant to issues being analyzed. The Observer speaks fluent English, French, German, Portuguese and Spanish, and also knows other languages. He holds an S.J.D. or Doctor of Juridical Science in International Law from Harvard University, and a Doctor of Law (J.D.) and a Master of the Science of Law (J.S.M.), from Stanford University. As an undergraduate, he received a Bachelor of Arts degree, also from Stanford, where he graduated “With Great Distinction” (summa cum laude) and received the James Birdsall Weter Prize for the best Senior Honors Thesis in History. In addition to having taught as a Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School, The Observer has been a Visiting Scholar at Harvard University's Center for International Affairs (CFIA). His fellowships include a Stanford Postdoctoral Fellowship in Law and Development, the Rómulo Gallegos Fellowship in International Human Rights awarded by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, and a Harvard MacArthur Fellowship in International Peace and Security. Beyond his articles in The Trenchant Observer, he is the author of two books and numerous scholarly articles on subjects of international and comparative law. Currently he is working on a manuscript drawing on the best articles that have appeared in the blog.

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